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Trust and Accountability: Why Transparancy is at the Core of Our Mission

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@HelenClarkUNDP

  • Helen ClarkAdministrator, United Nations Development Programme

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

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Transparency International Development Helen Clark

  • Helen ClarkAdministrator, United Nations Development Programme

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

More:

Transparency International Development Helen Clark

Helen Clark
Administrator, United Nations Development Programme 

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

Follow Helen Clark on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/HelenClarkUNDP

 

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Transparency International Development Helen Clark

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✿  Sergey IGNATENKO~ Hot and Cold Senses ✿ – Catherine La Rose Poesia e Arte

Sergey Ignatenko/Сергей Игнатенко (Russian)Was born in Gomel, Belarus in 1975. His career began in art school. As a child, he fiddled with paint and paintbrush and made figurative pictures with his mother’s and sister’s portraits. They were his models. In 1997 he successfully accomplished his studies in A. Hlebaw Minsk High School of Art. During his studying years he recommended himself as a respected artist and was also accepted to the Belarusian Artists Guild. He grew very fond of the impressionist artists and there Wonderful creations. He spent many years for perfecting his personal and individual style but never forgot the everlasting influence, which he fell in love with as a boy. His artwork has a nostalgia and romanticism of a Past time. The artworks are in collections in the USA, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Denmark, Israel, Belarus, Ukraine, Russia, Spain, Netherlands, Lithuania, Norway, Canada, South Africa.

Source: ✿ Sergey IGNATENKO ~ Hot and Cold Senses ✿ – Catherine La Rose Poesia e Arte

 

 

sarah_moon1

SARAH MOON POLAROIDS

SARAH MOON POLAROIDS

Sarah Moon

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.anatomyfilms.com%2Fsarah-moon-polaroids%2F&layout=standard&show_faces=false&width=450&action=like&colorscheme=lightI don’t think Sarah Moon would name a book or show ‘Polaroids’, because it is Helmut Newton who already came out with that title. Nevertheless, neither their techniques nor the resulting images have even a modicum of similarity.

© Sarah Moon

Sarah Moon and Polaroid

Mostly she was known for using Polaroid films and methods. At the same time, she was constantly evolving. She was known to use a simple polaroid pack film camera and Polaroid type 665 film. During the same time she also used a Nikon with Type 55 film. So you can see, she ran the gamut. But one thing was true; the exposures were long, and she many times shoved the resulting Polaroid negatives into her pocket. Almost daring provenance and her disregard for perfection to make it better!

Sarah Moon

The soft blurriness is really just a slow shutter speed combined a with slow film.  Old Polaroids had that sensor which would only allow it to trigger per the lighter/darker f stop user setting. The negatives were NOT washed properly and were “manhandled”  causing both scratches, dust and emulsion dripping. Her regard for negative purity was purposely remiss. Most of her images are toned silver prints, with a curiously haphazard toning process to further distress the image.

Impossible = Polaroid

Polaroid 665 is hard to get, but Impossible Project has sufficiently filled the gap. Actual Polaroid 665 is used, expired and rare. And about the price of gold. When I said they were long exposures. I meant 1/2 to 1 second,…and sometimes more. So that feeling of movement is really movement!

Sarah Moon

Sarah Moon was born in 1941 in England.  At first she studied art, but soon after began working as a  model, It wasn’t until 1968 that her photographic abilities were noticed by a gallery in Paris.  And her images always leaned toward the mysterious and surreal.  Although she is known now for more impressionistic imaging, she has only become more so since her days with Vogue, Elle, Marie-Claire and the other major fashion magazines.  It wasn’t like she changed overnight. She more like evolved.

An Alternate Reality

Her goal was to show her audience an alternate reality by forcing the film/emulsion to see in a new way. A one of a kind, organic assemblage. She couldn’t redo one of her images if she wanted. These are truly one of a kind works of art.

While the female form has always been an inspiration for her,…I would guess a holdover from her fashion photographer days,… she has expanded her conceptual imagery to include animals, birds, landscapes and objects. Always with that unplanned surrealism she’s most famous for.

Sarah Moon

In Sarah Moons’ world, grain is good. Lost detail in a black abyss is good. Movement blur is good. Muted forms and tones are good. Basically, everything you learn not to do in photography is good.

Sarah Moon

She has shot for all the big fashion houses early in her career. Dior, Chanel, Comme des Garcons, Christian Lacroix and others. She was the first woman to shoot the Pirelli calendar. But it is only in dreams that you can beckon the visuals of a Sarah Moon. She has always been, and will always be, one of a kind.

Sarah Moon works have been exhibited around the globe, in all the major cities, from London to Tokyo. Her legacy has been imprinted in stone in a style that is yet to be replicated.

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Wendy Ng with Bio

Wendy Ng ✿

Wendy Ng was born in Hong Kong, Educated in the United States, Belgium and the United Kingdom. Her heart has always desired to study art. She was also trained in Wimbledon School of Art’s Art and Design. Ng also has a background in advertising and publishing.
She paints in the traditional form but takes her ideas further by experimenting with patterns and textures creating a balance between Real-life Art and Abstract Art.
Wendy Ng captures beauty and femininity with her female portrait art, and making it more special with her ability to merge the abstract from realism. With emotions captured in every faces of her subjects, she is also able to create a patina of various patterns, which includes a subtle hint of geometrical art, leaves, rose petals, floral ornaments, spheres, pixels, squares, and many other shapes. The way she infuses these media into a luxurious form of portrait art is indeed amazing.

✿ Fulvio De MARINIS ✿ – Catherine La Rose Poesia e Arte

 

Votes Source: ✿ Fulvio De MARINIS ✿ – Catherine La Rose Poesia e Arte

Source: ✿ Fulvio De MARINIS ✿ – Catherine La Rose Poesia e Arte

 

2 Vote

 

 

Source: ✿ Fulvio De MARINIS ✿ – Catherine La Rose Poesia e Arte

#Helen4SG John Key pumps up Helen Clark in United Nations speech | Politics | Newshub

Mr Key bluntly told the UN, known for its inaction, that Helen Clark “gets things done” in his wide-ranging speech to the General Assembly.

Source: John Key pumps up Helen Clark in United Nations speech | Politics | Newshub

John Key has talked up Helen Clark in his speech to the United Nations General Assembly, saying only she can keep it relevant – a major swipe at the other candidates and countries.

Mr Key bluntly told the UN, known for its inaction, that “she gets things done”.

“This is not the time for a business as usual appointment for Secretary-General. We need someone who is up to the job,” Mr Key said.

“The next Secretary-General must have the courage, experience and skills necessary to lead this Organisation, to keep it relevant and responsive.”

Mr Key’s decision to use Ms Clark in his speech elevates the New Zealand campaign for her to be Secretary-General to another level.

His comments are also a swipe at current Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

“I’ve worked across the political divide from Helen Clark for years and I know her to be a natural leader,” Mr Key said.

“She rallies people together to find the common ground, even when the issues are difficult and the differences vast.

“She gets things done. We think it’s time for a Secretary-General like Helen Clark.”

Security Council fails Syria

Mr Key says the United Nations Security Council has failed Syria.

“We have also been deeply troubled to see the Council, the pre-eminent body for international peace and security, fail to live up to its responsibilities on the most serious crisis of our time. Syria.

“Here the Council has fallen short,” he said.

“The internal politics within the Council and the sheer complexity of the Syria crisis have obstructed a unified Council response.

“But we believe that no matter how difficult and sensitive the issues, the Council cannot watch the situation go from bad to worse for the Syrian people.

“The Security Council was established to address crises like that which we see in Syria.

“That is why New Zealand is using our Presidency of the Council to convene a leaders’ level meeting tomorrow on Syria.

“A meeting by itself won’t stop the conflict. But after more than five years of brutal fighting, and horrific humanitarian suffering, we do not think it is credible for Leaders to come to New York and not address the stark realities driving the conflict.”

“We hope tomorrow’s meeting will provide an opportunity for Council Leaders to take stock of developments, examine the fundamental issues at the heart of the conflict, and discuss how we can move towards a sustainable political solution.

“We also hope the meeting will be a chance for the Council to put its weight behind the ceasefire agreement reached between the United States and Russia.

“That agreement is the best chance we have had in some time to stop the fighting, get aid to those who need it, and get back on track for a political resolution to the crisis.”

Key speaks out against protectionism

Mr Key also took the fight to trade protectionism of the kind put forward by Donald Trump, or Brexit.

“Borders are closing to people and products, to investment, to ideas. Many states are turning inwards.”

“The politics of fear and extremism are gaining ground. Too many states are flouting the rules.”

“We must guard against creeping protectionism, and be willing to make the case for more economic engagement clearly.

“We cannot turn inwards,” he said.

“We can’t allow fear, or narrow domestic interests turn us away from an open global trading system, which has lifted millions out of poverty.”

North Korea ‘a pressing threat’

John Key made special mention of the danger of North Korea and its Nuclear weapons.

“Another critical issue on which New Zealand supports unified Council action, is the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

“New Zealand believes that a strong international response is required to the DPRK nuclear test on the 9th of September, and its recent missile tests.

“The regime’s efforts to advance its nuclear and missile programmes; its callous disregard for the North Korean people – as demonstrated by the dire human rights situation in the country; and its leader’s unpredictably ruthless rule have made it one of our most pressing international security threats.

“Its provocative actions show blatant disregard for Security Council resolutions and pose a grave threat to the international law.

“They have raised tensions on the Korean peninsula to a point where the risk of conflict is dangerously high. We cannot afford further escalation.

“So New Zealand welcomes recent steps by the US and China to begin negotiating a new Security Council Resolution, following the DPRK’s recent nuclear test.

“We hope that this will send a clear signal to the North Korean leadership that continued provocative and dangerous actions are unacceptable; and that a return to the negotiating table represents the only sensible way forward.”

Trans-Pacific Partnership ‘will bring us closer together’

“We need it to find common ground that overcomes vested national interests, and agree to new international trade commitments that benefit all countries.

“In the Asia Pacific region, closer economic integration through trade agreements like the Trans Pacific Partnership and Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership will also bring us closer together.

“Agreements like these will make our region and people better off by setting the conditions for more open and transparent trade.”

Newshub.