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Trust and Accountability: Why Transparancy is at the Core of Our Mission

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@HelenClarkUNDP

  • Helen ClarkAdministrator, United Nations Development Programme

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

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Transparency International Development Helen Clark

  • Helen ClarkAdministrator, United Nations Development Programme

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

More:

Transparency International Development Helen Clark

Helen Clark
Administrator, United Nations Development Programme 

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

Follow Helen Clark on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/HelenClarkUNDP

 

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Transparency International Development Helen Clark

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#Helen4SG Investment in youth and women critical to Africa’s development, says #UNDP Chief | 

 

@Helen4SG made her remarks during the opening of the sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD), a conference held regularly to promote high-level policy dialogue between Japan, African leaders, and development partners.

Source: Investment in youth and women critical to Africa’s development, says UN Development Chief | UNDP

Nairobi, Kenya – Investing in women and youth must be at the heart of the development agenda in Africa, said the head of the UN’s development activities today in Kenya’s capital, Nairobi.

“Africa’s large youth population presents an enormous opportunity for development”, said Helen Clark, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).  “Harnessing the potential of Africa’s youth by investing in education, skills development, and other social initiatives can reap enormous dividends and spur the continent’s development.”

Helen Clark made her remarks during the opening of the sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD), a conference held regularly to promote high-level policy dialogue between Japan, African leaders, and development partners. UNDP has been a co-organiser of TICAD for more than two decades.

At this year’s TICAD conference, UNDP’s new Africa Human Development Report will be launched. It focuses on accelerating gender equality and women’s empowerment in Africa.  Lower economic growth because of gender inequality was a key point highlighted in the Administrator’s remarks.

The report finds that sub-Saharan Africa loses an average of USD 95 billion annually from the gender gap in labour force participation alone, and that African women achieve only 87 per cent of the human development outcomes of men, jeopardizing achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and Africa’s Agenda 2063.

Helen Clark also highlighted progress in recent years, particularly in the field of education.

“Africa’s growing youth population has more access to education than ever before,” she said.  “By 2030, close to sixty per cent of 20-24 year olds – or 137 million people – will have had secondary education compared to 42 per cent in 2012.  Trends like these are contributing to a growing pool of skilled workers.”

The Administrator praised the impact the partnerships promoted by TICAD have made in supporting human development in Africa.

“Africa is home to some of the world’s fastest growing economies, averaging five per cent growth per year since 2000, and many countries are also experiencing fast rising human development,” she said.  “The TICAD partnership has contributed to these trends, including by supporting access to education, health services, water and sanitation, and supporting entrepreneurship for youth and the facilitation of trade.”

TICAD VI is hosted by the Government of Kenya and is co-organized by the Government of Japan, UNDP, the World Bank, the Africa Union Commission (AUC) and the UN Office of the Special Advisor on Africa (UNOSAA). Emphasizing UNDP’s objective of mobilizing support for Africa-owned development initiatives, TICAD VI marks the first summit in the series to take place in Africa.

“I sincerely thank the Government of Kenya for its hospitality, and acknowledge the Government of Japan’s unwavering support for Africa, and also its strong partnership with UNDP,” concluded Helen Clark.

Contact Information

Nairobi, Lamine Bal, +254 795 752 726 or lamine.bal@undp.org
Nairobi, Sandra Macharia, +254 795 752 725 or sandra.macharia@undp.org
New York, Christina LoNigro, +1212 906 5301 or Christina.lonigro@undp.org

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Africa Human Development Report 2016 | UNDP

Gender inequality is costing sub-Saharan Africa on average $US95 billion a year, peaking at US$105 billion in 2014– or six percent of the region’s GDP – jeopardising the continent’s efforts for inclusive human development and economic growth, according to the Africa Human Development Report 2016.

Source: Africa Human Development Report 2016 | UNDP

Advancing Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment in Africa

Gender inequality is costing sub-Saharan Africa on average $US95 billion a year, peaking at US$105 billion in 2014– or six percent of the region’s GDP – jeopardising the continent’s efforts for inclusive human development and economic growth, according to the Africa Human Development Report 2016.

 

The report analyses the political, economic and social drivers that hamper African women’s advancement and proposes policies and concrete actions to close the gender gap. These include addressing the contradiction between legal provisions and practice in gender laws; breaking down harmful social norms and transforming discriminatory institutional settings; and securing women’s economic, social and political participation.

 

Deeply-rooted structural obstacles such as unequal distribution of resources, power and wealth, combined with social institutions and norms that sustain inequality are holding African women, and the rest of the continent, back. The report estimates that a 1 percent increase in gender inequality reduces a country’s human development index by 0.75 percent.

Highlights

  • African women achieve only 87 percent of the human development outcomes of men
  • African women hold 66 percent of the all jobs in the non-agricultural informal sector and only make 70 cents for each dollar made by men
  • Only between 7 and 30 percent of all private firms have a female manager
  • Gender gap costs sub-Sahara Africa $US95 billion a year
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Sante D’Orazio – The Death of Sensuality – Anatomy Films

 

A very “famous” photographer in the 80’s and 90’s was Sante D’Orazio who seemed to be everywhere and then just gone D’Orazio was swimming

Source: Sante D’Orazio – The Death of Sensuality – Anatomy Films

SANTE D’ORAZIO – THE DEATH OF SENSUALITY

D'Orazio

Sante D’Orazio

Sante D'OrazioYoung photographers use to sometimes tell me that their goal was to become a “famous” photographer. My answer was always the same; “If the point of your photography is to become famous, become a hip hop artist. It’s easier.”  A very “famous” photographer in the 80’s and 90’s was Sante D’Orazio who seemed to be everywhere and then just gone. But he is still around, and still doing some beautiful work. In fact, he’s having a new show at Christie’s, one of the premier high end auction houses in the world. I’m sure it will include some of his iconic celebrity images.

An Era’s Demise

A Brooklyn-born photographer, it was actually Andy Warhol who gave him his first job. His peers at the time were Patrick Demarchelier, Herb Ritts, Peter Lindbergh, two being mostly known for their black and white film work. D’Orazio was a big deal at the end of the film era. When you had to actually know what you were doing. Before Art Directors started parroting the mantra, “Photogs are a dime a dozen!” The one thing that permeated those times were some of the best and most sensuous models of all time. In fact, I think it was really the start of the “super model” era. Before that, models were mostly just anonymous “mannequins”.

D’Orazio was swimming in the heightened ambiance of the Christy Turlingtons, Helena Christensens, Linda Evangalistas and Cindy Crawfords of the time, and he made the most of it. The lighting and sensuality of his images pretty much put him, and a few others, at the end of an era.

Apparently his over the top sensual style went out of fashion with the dumbos in the industry. So, it was off to celebrity work, where he shot Keith Richards, Angelina Jolie, Michelle Pfeiffer and others. It was less the dawn of the digital era, and more the “heroin chic” style that put him in reset mode.

Sante D'Orazio

Keith Richards

In 2005, he had a gallery show of explicit portraits of Pam Anderson, which appeared to be his excuse to exit the commercial world, and delve more into the art market. A very high mountain to climb for anyone. But being trained as a painter in his youth, turning away from fashion was really not a stretch for him.

From Commercial to Art

The thing about fashion photography is it’s very hard to take a break before clients stop calling. It’s a very unforgiving business. In fashion photography, socializing is probably more important than even the images! While office politics is the norm for many job descriptions, the fashion industry probably exhibits it to the nth degree.

His sales at Christie’s are apparently going well, with limited edition prints going from $50,000 to $120,000. So, life is good for Sante D’Orazio, and you may be seeing a lot more of him. Assuming those in power get their heads out of their……uhh, nevermind.

He’s not the first to try to go from commercial to entering the art world, with varying degrees of success. We all hope Sante D’Orazio comes back. This world needs his vision of sensuality.

Books

Video Promo

 

Sante D'Orazio

 

 

Sante D'Orazio

Kate Moss

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Paolo Roversi – Large Format Legend – Anatomy Films

 

Paolo Roversi is an amazing talent, but continues to be a low key enigma to many. His style and technique is unique and has no equal. His large format,

Source: Paolo Roversi – Large Format Legend – Anatomy Films

PAOLO ROVERSI – LARGE FORMAT LEGEND

paolo roversi
 Paolo Roversi – 8×10 Portraiture
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Amber Valletta by Paolo Roversi

I put Paolo Roversi in the Art Photographers category for a reason. I’ve never heard him refer to himself as a “Fashion Photographer”, despite that most people think of him that way.

Paolo Roversi is an amazing talent, but he continues to be a low key enigma to many. His style and technique is unique and has no equal. His large format, (8×10), affinity puts him in a league all his own, especially in a digital age. Even when he started, (before digital), it was rare to do potraiture or fashion in anything other than 35mm or medium format, which always made him the odd man out.

Born in Ravenna in 1947, Paolo Roversi’s interest in photography was kindled as a teenager during a family vacation in Spain in 1964. Back home, he set up a darkroom in a convenient cellar with another keen amateur, the local postman Battista Minguzzi, and began developing and printing his own black & white work. The encounter with a local professional photographer Nevio Natali was very important: in Nevio’s studio, Roversi spent many hours realising an important apprenticeship as well as a strong durable friendship.

In 1970, he started collaborating with the Associated Press: on his first assignment, AP sent Roversi to cover Ezra Pound’s funeral in Venice. During the same year, Roversi opened, with his friend Giancarlo Gramantieri his first portrait studio, located in Ravenna, via Cavour, 58, photographing local celebrities and their families. In 1971, he met by chance in Ravenna, Peter Knapp, the legendary Art Director of Elle magazine. At Knapp’s invitation, Roversi visited Paris in November 1973 and has never left.

In Paris, Roversi started working as a reporter for the Huppert Agency but little by little, through his friends, he began to approach fashion photography. The photographers who really interested him then were reporters. At that moment he didn’t know much about fashion or fashion photography. Only later, he discovered the work of Avedon, Penn, Newton, Bourdin, and many others.

paolo roversi

From the Book ‘NUDI’

Paolo Roversi shoots some of the most elegant photography in the fashion industry. His measured, classical style is made magical by his skill at manipulating light. His haunting, unguarded shots consistently strip away the facade of his subjects and draw out their raw selves, offseting fashion’s tendency to conceal and recast.

These days, Roversi’s commercial clients include Yamamoto , Comme des Garçons, Christian Dior and many others. He has shot for i-D Magazine, W Magazine, Vanity Fair, most of the Vogues, and many others.

Roversi’s interest in photography was sparked as a teenager during a family vacation in Spain in 1964. Once home he set up a darkroom in his cellar with the help of the local postman Battista Minguzzi. Roversi soon apprenticed himself to a local photographer in order to hone his craft further.

In 1970 Roversi opened his first portrait studio photographing local celebrities and their families with his friend Giancarlo Gramantieri. In 1971 he met Peter Knapp, the Art Director of Elle magazine, by chance, in Ravenna. At Knapp’s invitation, Roversi visited Paris in November 1973 and has never left.

The British photographer Lawrence Sackmann took Roversi on as his assistant in 1974. Roversi has commented that, “Sackmann was very difficult. Most assistants only lasted a week before running away. But he taught me everything I needed to know in order to become a professional photographer. Sackmann taught me creativity. He was always trying new things even if he did always use the same camera and flash set-up. He was almost military-like in his approach to preparation for a shoot. But he always used to say ‘your tripod and your camera must be well-fixed but your eyes and mind should be free’.” Roversi endured Sackmann for nine months before starting on his own with small jobs for magazines such as Elle and Depeche Mode; his first big break came when Marie Claire published his first major fashion story.

The Roversi Technique:

paolo roversi

Pure Art….Believe it or not, Kate Moss

“My photography is more subtraction than addition. I always try to take off things. We all have a sort of mask of expression. You say goodbye, you smile, you are scared. I try to take all these masks away and little by little subtract until you have something pure left. A kind of abandon, a kind of absence. It looks like an absence, but in fact when there is this emptiness I think the interior beauty comes out. This is my technique.”

“Portraits are what interest me the most in photography. I am a portrait photographer. I treat fashion photography like a portraitist….It is the atmosphere and the mood of a portrait which brings clothes to life,” explained the photographer Paolo Roversi in an interview for Vogue Paris, February 2003. A partner on the Nouvelle Vague (New Wave) editorial in the June/July 2015 issue of Vogue ParisToday, the artist has built a remarkable career in photography.

He is known for shooting with 8×10 Polaroid film, and claimed to buy as much as he could find before it was discontinued. I would venture to guess he has some of the last 8×10 sheets of Polaroid on the planet.

Paolo’s Website Photographs

Books

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Patrick Demarchelier – When Film was King – Anatomy Films

In the early 70’s, Patrick Demarchelier was already King in the fashion world, like Elvis in the music world. Elvis died in 1977, but Patrick Demarchelier

Source: Patrick Demarchelier – When Film was King – Anatomy Films

 

PATRICK DEMARCHELIER – WHEN FILM WAS KING

Patrick Demarchelier

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.anatomyfilms.com%2Fpatrick-demarchelier-elvis-king%2F&layout=standard&show_faces=false&width=450&action=like&colorscheme=lightIn the early 70’s, Patrick Demarchelier was already working on becoming King in the fashion world. Patrick Demarchelier went on to be a mainstay of some of the most iconic images for Vogue and every other major magazine of the time. As the 90’s rolled around, anybody who was anybody sought the exacting beauty and lighting technique of Patrick Demarchelier.

Patrick Demarchelier – An Uneventful Beginning

Born near Paris in 1943 to a modest family, he spent his childhood in Le Havre with his mother and four brothers. When he was seventeen, his stepdad bought him at Kodak camera. Little box thingie. He learned how to do it all,…develop film, retouch negatives, and more. He shot friends at first, then graduated to weddings.

Patrick Demarchelier

© Patrick Demarchelier

In 1975, he left Paris for New York where his girlfriend was. He was a freelance photographer and was slowly learning his craft by working with photographers such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Terry King, and Jacque Guilbert. Finally, his work drew the attention of the magazines Elle, Marie Claire and 20 Ans.In 1992 he started working for Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. This lasted about 12 years. But it was Demarcheliers’ advertising campaigns for Dior, Louis Vuitton, Celine, TAG Heuer, Chanel, Donna Karan, Yves Saint Laurent, Tommy Hilfiger, Carolina Herrera, Moschino, Vera Wang, Elizabeth Arden, H&M, Sam Edelman, Zara, Max Azria, Express, Longchamp, Blumarine, Lacoste, Ann Taylor, Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren that really blew the lid off. To say he was “in demand” would be a vast understatement.

New York Calls

Demarchelier has lived in New York City since 1975. He is married to Mia and they have twins. Since the late 1970s he has shot the covers for nearly every major fashion magazine including American, British and Paris Vogue. Demarchelier has also shot covers for Rolling Stone, Glamour, Life, Newsweek, Elle and Mademoiselle. He has photographed many advertising campaigns, including Farrah Fawcett shampoo in 1978, the Brooke Shields doll in 1982, Lauren by Ralph Lauren, Cutty Sark, and a Calvin Klein ad with Talisa Soto and much more.

Patrick Demarchelier

© Patrick Demarchelier

He was also the primary photographer for the book “On Your Own”, a beauty/lifestyle guide written for young women by Brooke Shields. Since 1992 he has worked with Harper’s Bazaar, becoming its premier photographer. Demarchelier was awarded the contract for the 2005 Pirelli Calendar. Over the years he has catapulted the careers of many make-up artists like Laura Mercier, Jason Marks and Pat McGrath.

A Major Movie Mention

He is referenced in the 2006 film “The Devil Wears Prada”, when Miranda Priestly (Meryl Streep), asks Andy (Anne Hathaway), on her very first day on the job, “Did Demarchelier confirm?”. The first assistant Emily calmly jumps into action and calls his office, replying, “I have Patrick!” He also appears in the documentary “The September Issue”, which is about Anna Wintour and her influence on American Vogue. Demarchelier was also in the film version of “Sex and the City”. He can be seen taking pictures during Carrie Bradshaw’s fashion shoot for Vogue magazine. He was also featured in “America’s Next Top Model” for the fashion photography icon he is. He’s also been on a couple of ‘Best Dressed’ lists. I guess all that ‘fashion’ rubbed off on him!

Patrick Demarchelier

Scarlett Johansson by Patrick Demarchelier

The Final Honors

In 2007, the French Minister of Culture honored Patrick Demarchelier as an ‘Officer in l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres’ (Order of Arts and Literature). He has exhibited extensively in New York, and his work in the worlds of Art, Fashion and Beauty can be viewed at his website. His books have become collectibles, including the ones for Dior.

If learning the use of light and beauty is your goal, than there is no better master to study than the images of Patrick Demarchelier. The extensive lighting perfection will astonish you.

Books

Website