Biography – Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator #She4SG #Helen4SG #NextSG the next UN Secretary-General 

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Source: Biography – Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator   Helen Clark Biography of the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme Helen Clark became the Administrator of the U…

Source: Biography – Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator

Biography of the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme

Helen Clark became the Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme on 17 April 2009, and is the first woman to lead the organization. She is also the Chair of the United Nations Development Group, a committee consisting of the heads of all UN funds, programmes and departments working on development issues.

Prior to her appointment with UNDP, Helen Clark served for nine years as Prime Minister of New Zealand, serving three successive terms from 1999 – 2008. Throughout her tenure as Prime Minister, Helen Clark engaged widely in policy development and advocacy across the international, economic, social and cultural spheres. Under her leadership, New Zealand achieved significant economic growth, low levels of unemployment, and high levels of investment in education and health, and in the well-being of families and older citizens. She and her government prioritized reconciliation and the settlement of historical grievances with New Zealand’s indigenous people and the development of an inclusive multicultural and multi-faith society.

Helen Clark advocated strongly for New Zealand’s comprehensive programme on sustainability and for tackling the problems of climate change. Her objectives have been to establish New Zealand as being among the world’s leading nations in dealing with these challenges. Helen Clark was also an active leader of her country’s foreign relations and policies, engaging in a wide range of international issues. As Prime Minister, Helen Clark was a member of the Council of Women World Leaders, an international network of current and former women presidents and prime ministers whose mission is to mobilize the highest-level women leaders globally for collective action on issues of critical importance to women and equitable development.

Helen Clark held ministerial responsibility during her nine years as Prime Minister for New Zealand’s intelligence agencies and for the portfolio of arts, culture and heritage. She has seen the promotion of this latter portfolio as important in expressing the unique identity of her nation in a positive way.

Helen Clark came to the role of Prime Minister after an extensive parliamentary and ministerial career. First elected to Parliament in 1981, Helen Clark was re-elected to her multicultural Auckland constituency for the tenth time in November 2008. Earlier in her career, she chaired Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee.

Between 1987 and 1990, she was a Minister responsible for first, the portfolios of Conservation and Housing, and then Health and Labour. She was Deputy Prime Minister between August 1989 and November 1990. From that date until December 1993 she served as Deputy Leader of the Opposition, and then as Leader of the Opposition until winning the election in November 1999.

Prior to entering the New Zealand Parliament, Helen Clark taught in the Political Studies Department of the University of Auckland. She graduated with a BA in 1971 and an MA with First Class Honours in 1974. She is married to Peter Davis, a Professor at Auckland University.

Post of the UNDP Administrator

The UNDP Administrator is appointed by the Secretary-General and confirmed by the General Assembly for a term of four years. Paul G. Hoffman was appointed as the first Administrator of UNDP in 1966 and served until retirement in 1972. David Owen, who led UNDP’s predecessor organization, the Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance (EPTA), was appointed as Mr. Hoffman’s Co-Administrator. Rudolph A. Peterson was appointed Administrator in 1972 followed by Bradford Morse in 1976; William H. Draper lll, 1986; James Gustave Speth, 1993 to 30 June 1999; Mark Malloch Brown, 1999-2005; and Kemal Derviş, 2005-2009.

#She4SG Procedure of Selecting and Appointing the next UN Secretary-General #Helen4SG #NextSG

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LPresident Lykketoft has committed to running his Presidency in the most open and transparent manner possible. This also applies to the process of selecting and appointing the next United Nations S…

Source: Procedure of Selecting and Appointing the next UN Secretary-General

Africa Human Development Report 2016 | UNDP

Gender inequality is costing sub-Saharan Africa on average $US95 billion a year, peaking at US$105 billion in 2014– or six percent of the region’s GDP – jeopardising the continent’s efforts for inclusive human development and economic growth, according to the Africa Human Development Report 2016.

Source: Africa Human Development Report 2016 | UNDP

Advancing Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment in Africa

Gender inequality is costing sub-Saharan Africa on average $US95 billion a year, peaking at US$105 billion in 2014– or six percent of the region’s GDP – jeopardising the continent’s efforts for inclusive human development and economic growth, according to the Africa Human Development Report 2016.

 

The report analyses the political, economic and social drivers that hamper African women’s advancement and proposes policies and concrete actions to close the gender gap. These include addressing the contradiction between legal provisions and practice in gender laws; breaking down harmful social norms and transforming discriminatory institutional settings; and securing women’s economic, social and political participation.

 

Deeply-rooted structural obstacles such as unequal distribution of resources, power and wealth, combined with social institutions and norms that sustain inequality are holding African women, and the rest of the continent, back. The report estimates that a 1 percent increase in gender inequality reduces a country’s human development index by 0.75 percent.

Highlights

  • African women achieve only 87 percent of the human development outcomes of men
  • African women hold 66 percent of the all jobs in the non-agricultural informal sector and only make 70 cents for each dollar made by men
  • Only between 7 and 30 percent of all private firms have a female manager
  • Gender gap costs sub-Sahara Africa $US95 billion a year

#Helen4SG Investment in youth and women critical to Africa’s development, says #UNDP Chief | 

 

@Helen4SG made her remarks during the opening of the sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD), a conference held regularly to promote high-level policy dialogue between Japan, African leaders, and development partners.

Source: Investment in youth and women critical to Africa’s development, says UN Development Chief | UNDP

Nairobi, Kenya – Investing in women and youth must be at the heart of the development agenda in Africa, said the head of the UN’s development activities today in Kenya’s capital, Nairobi.

“Africa’s large youth population presents an enormous opportunity for development”, said Helen Clark, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).  “Harnessing the potential of Africa’s youth by investing in education, skills development, and other social initiatives can reap enormous dividends and spur the continent’s development.”

Helen Clark made her remarks during the opening of the sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD), a conference held regularly to promote high-level policy dialogue between Japan, African leaders, and development partners. UNDP has been a co-organiser of TICAD for more than two decades.

At this year’s TICAD conference, UNDP’s new Africa Human Development Report will be launched. It focuses on accelerating gender equality and women’s empowerment in Africa.  Lower economic growth because of gender inequality was a key point highlighted in the Administrator’s remarks.

The report finds that sub-Saharan Africa loses an average of USD 95 billion annually from the gender gap in labour force participation alone, and that African women achieve only 87 per cent of the human development outcomes of men, jeopardizing achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and Africa’s Agenda 2063.

Helen Clark also highlighted progress in recent years, particularly in the field of education.

“Africa’s growing youth population has more access to education than ever before,” she said.  “By 2030, close to sixty per cent of 20-24 year olds – or 137 million people – will have had secondary education compared to 42 per cent in 2012.  Trends like these are contributing to a growing pool of skilled workers.”

The Administrator praised the impact the partnerships promoted by TICAD have made in supporting human development in Africa.

“Africa is home to some of the world’s fastest growing economies, averaging five per cent growth per year since 2000, and many countries are also experiencing fast rising human development,” she said.  “The TICAD partnership has contributed to these trends, including by supporting access to education, health services, water and sanitation, and supporting entrepreneurship for youth and the facilitation of trade.”

TICAD VI is hosted by the Government of Kenya and is co-organized by the Government of Japan, UNDP, the World Bank, the Africa Union Commission (AUC) and the UN Office of the Special Advisor on Africa (UNOSAA). Emphasizing UNDP’s objective of mobilizing support for Africa-owned development initiatives, TICAD VI marks the first summit in the series to take place in Africa.

“I sincerely thank the Government of Kenya for its hospitality, and acknowledge the Government of Japan’s unwavering support for Africa, and also its strong partnership with UNDP,” concluded Helen Clark.

Contact Information

Nairobi, Lamine Bal, +254 795 752 726 or lamine.bal@undp.org
Nairobi, Sandra Macharia, +254 795 752 725 or sandra.macharia@undp.org
New York, Christina LoNigro, +1212 906 5301 or Christina.lonigro@undp.org

Sante D’Orazio – The Death of Sensuality – Anatomy Films

 

A very “famous” photographer in the 80’s and 90’s was Sante D’Orazio who seemed to be everywhere and then just gone D’Orazio was swimming

Source: Sante D’Orazio – The Death of Sensuality – Anatomy Films

SANTE D’ORAZIO – THE DEATH OF SENSUALITY

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Sante D’Orazio

Sante D'OrazioYoung photographers use to sometimes tell me that their goal was to become a “famous” photographer. My answer was always the same; “If the point of your photography is to become famous, become a hip hop artist. It’s easier.”  A very “famous” photographer in the 80’s and 90’s was Sante D’Orazio who seemed to be everywhere and then just gone. But he is still around, and still doing some beautiful work. In fact, he’s having a new show at Christie’s, one of the premier high end auction houses in the world. I’m sure it will include some of his iconic celebrity images.

An Era’s Demise

A Brooklyn-born photographer, it was actually Andy Warhol who gave him his first job. His peers at the time were Patrick Demarchelier, Herb Ritts, Peter Lindbergh, two being mostly known for their black and white film work. D’Orazio was a big deal at the end of the film era. When you had to actually know what you were doing. Before Art Directors started parroting the mantra, “Photogs are a dime a dozen!” The one thing that permeated those times were some of the best and most sensuous models of all time. In fact, I think it was really the start of the “super model” era. Before that, models were mostly just anonymous “mannequins”.

D’Orazio was swimming in the heightened ambiance of the Christy Turlingtons, Helena Christensens, Linda Evangalistas and Cindy Crawfords of the time, and he made the most of it. The lighting and sensuality of his images pretty much put him, and a few others, at the end of an era.

Apparently his over the top sensual style went out of fashion with the dumbos in the industry. So, it was off to celebrity work, where he shot Keith Richards, Angelina Jolie, Michelle Pfeiffer and others. It was less the dawn of the digital era, and more the “heroin chic” style that put him in reset mode.

Sante D'Orazio

Keith Richards

In 2005, he had a gallery show of explicit portraits of Pam Anderson, which appeared to be his excuse to exit the commercial world, and delve more into the art market. A very high mountain to climb for anyone. But being trained as a painter in his youth, turning away from fashion was really not a stretch for him.

From Commercial to Art

The thing about fashion photography is it’s very hard to take a break before clients stop calling. It’s a very unforgiving business. In fashion photography, socializing is probably more important than even the images! While office politics is the norm for many job descriptions, the fashion industry probably exhibits it to the nth degree.

His sales at Christie’s are apparently going well, with limited edition prints going from $50,000 to $120,000. So, life is good for Sante D’Orazio, and you may be seeing a lot more of him. Assuming those in power get their heads out of their……uhh, nevermind.

He’s not the first to try to go from commercial to entering the art world, with varying degrees of success. We all hope Sante D’Orazio comes back. This world needs his vision of sensuality.

Books

Video Promo

 

Sante D'Orazio

 

 

Sante D'Orazio

Kate Moss

Paolo Roversi – Large Format Legend – Anatomy Films

 

Paolo Roversi is an amazing talent, but continues to be a low key enigma to many. His style and technique is unique and has no equal. His large format,

Source: Paolo Roversi – Large Format Legend – Anatomy Films

PAOLO ROVERSI – LARGE FORMAT LEGEND

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 Paolo Roversi – 8×10 Portraiture
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Amber Valletta by Paolo Roversi

I put Paolo Roversi in the Art Photographers category for a reason. I’ve never heard him refer to himself as a “Fashion Photographer”, despite that most people think of him that way.

Paolo Roversi is an amazing talent, but he continues to be a low key enigma to many. His style and technique is unique and has no equal. His large format, (8×10), affinity puts him in a league all his own, especially in a digital age. Even when he started, (before digital), it was rare to do potraiture or fashion in anything other than 35mm or medium format, which always made him the odd man out.

Born in Ravenna in 1947, Paolo Roversi’s interest in photography was kindled as a teenager during a family vacation in Spain in 1964. Back home, he set up a darkroom in a convenient cellar with another keen amateur, the local postman Battista Minguzzi, and began developing and printing his own black & white work. The encounter with a local professional photographer Nevio Natali was very important: in Nevio’s studio, Roversi spent many hours realising an important apprenticeship as well as a strong durable friendship.

In 1970, he started collaborating with the Associated Press: on his first assignment, AP sent Roversi to cover Ezra Pound’s funeral in Venice. During the same year, Roversi opened, with his friend Giancarlo Gramantieri his first portrait studio, located in Ravenna, via Cavour, 58, photographing local celebrities and their families. In 1971, he met by chance in Ravenna, Peter Knapp, the legendary Art Director of Elle magazine. At Knapp’s invitation, Roversi visited Paris in November 1973 and has never left.

In Paris, Roversi started working as a reporter for the Huppert Agency but little by little, through his friends, he began to approach fashion photography. The photographers who really interested him then were reporters. At that moment he didn’t know much about fashion or fashion photography. Only later, he discovered the work of Avedon, Penn, Newton, Bourdin, and many others.

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From the Book ‘NUDI’

Paolo Roversi shoots some of the most elegant photography in the fashion industry. His measured, classical style is made magical by his skill at manipulating light. His haunting, unguarded shots consistently strip away the facade of his subjects and draw out their raw selves, offseting fashion’s tendency to conceal and recast.

These days, Roversi’s commercial clients include Yamamoto , Comme des Garçons, Christian Dior and many others. He has shot for i-D Magazine, W Magazine, Vanity Fair, most of the Vogues, and many others.

Roversi’s interest in photography was sparked as a teenager during a family vacation in Spain in 1964. Once home he set up a darkroom in his cellar with the help of the local postman Battista Minguzzi. Roversi soon apprenticed himself to a local photographer in order to hone his craft further.

In 1970 Roversi opened his first portrait studio photographing local celebrities and their families with his friend Giancarlo Gramantieri. In 1971 he met Peter Knapp, the Art Director of Elle magazine, by chance, in Ravenna. At Knapp’s invitation, Roversi visited Paris in November 1973 and has never left.

The British photographer Lawrence Sackmann took Roversi on as his assistant in 1974. Roversi has commented that, “Sackmann was very difficult. Most assistants only lasted a week before running away. But he taught me everything I needed to know in order to become a professional photographer. Sackmann taught me creativity. He was always trying new things even if he did always use the same camera and flash set-up. He was almost military-like in his approach to preparation for a shoot. But he always used to say ‘your tripod and your camera must be well-fixed but your eyes and mind should be free’.” Roversi endured Sackmann for nine months before starting on his own with small jobs for magazines such as Elle and Depeche Mode; his first big break came when Marie Claire published his first major fashion story.

The Roversi Technique:

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Pure Art….Believe it or not, Kate Moss

“My photography is more subtraction than addition. I always try to take off things. We all have a sort of mask of expression. You say goodbye, you smile, you are scared. I try to take all these masks away and little by little subtract until you have something pure left. A kind of abandon, a kind of absence. It looks like an absence, but in fact when there is this emptiness I think the interior beauty comes out. This is my technique.”

“Portraits are what interest me the most in photography. I am a portrait photographer. I treat fashion photography like a portraitist….It is the atmosphere and the mood of a portrait which brings clothes to life,” explained the photographer Paolo Roversi in an interview for Vogue Paris, February 2003. A partner on the Nouvelle Vague (New Wave) editorial in the June/July 2015 issue of Vogue ParisToday, the artist has built a remarkable career in photography.

He is known for shooting with 8×10 Polaroid film, and claimed to buy as much as he could find before it was discontinued. I would venture to guess he has some of the last 8×10 sheets of Polaroid on the planet.

Paolo’s Website Photographs

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