Egyptian Aak 2016 – Week 43 ( Oct 24 – 30) | Nervana

Top Headlines At least 22 people were killed and 72 injured in flooding in parts of Egypt Egypt condemned the Saudi head of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation for mocking its president Sisi Fo…

Source: Egyptian Aak 2016 – cfyoauwwgaeakb9111112212 ( Oct 24 – 30) | Nervana

Top Headlines

  • At least 22 people were killed and 72 injured in flooding in parts of Egypt
  • Egypt condemned the Saudi head of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation for mocking its president Sisi
  • Four policemen remanded into custody over Ismailia prison break-out
  • Egypt bans TV interview with corruption critic
  • Egypt’s Sisi says military economy just 1-1.5% of GDP
  • Four policemen are remanded into custody over Ismailia prison breakout

Mideast Weather

Rights groups condemn ‘blatantly inflammatory’ comments by Myanmar minister on Rohingya ‘invasion’ | Coconuts Yangon

 

The Home Minister accused Rohingya Muslims of “invading” the country.

Source: Rights groups condemn ‘blatantly inflammatory’ comments by Myanmar minister on Rohingya ‘invasion’ | Coconuts Yangon

 

Rohingya Muslim girls in an internal displacement camp outside Sittwe, the Rakhine state capital. Photo: Coconuts Media

Rights activists have condemned comments from Myanmar’s Home Affairs Minister accusing Rohingya Muslims of “invading” the country as “blatantly inflammatory” and “disturbing”.

Even as the government seeks to calm fears of further strife in Rakhine state following deadly attacks on border police, the senior official gave an angry interview on Monday echoing nationalist fears of an Islamization of the country.

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Speaking to reporters in Rakhine state, Lieutenant General Kyaw Swe, of the military-controlled Home Affairs Ministry, said: “I am not happy with this happening. The police, together with the army, should protect from an invasion by any inches.”

He claimed Rohingya Muslims, an oppressed minority in Rakhine state, were outbreeding their Rakhine Buddhist counterparts, framing their presence as a threat. The October 9 attacks, which killed nine police in northern Rakhine, have been blamed on a little-known alleged Rohingya outfit named Aqa-Mul-Mujahidin. Rohingya leaders have condemned the violence.

“If our ethnic people [Rakhine] leave their own places, [Rohingya] will replace them. I don’t want this to happen,” Lieutenant General Kyaw Swe said, referring to the flight of Buddhists from northern Rakhine following the attacks. “For us, one man only marries a woman. For them, a man marries four women. If one is breeding 10 children, there can be 40 people in a family. So I want our ethnic people to love their own places.”

Data on religious and ethnic affiliation from the most recent 2014 census did not take Rohingya Muslims into account, but showed the countrywide Muslim population to be far lower than expected.

The politician also implied the Rohingya in northern Rakhine state, where the violence happened, were recent arrivals. Many members of the group can trace their presence back generations.

“As we are the Ministry of Home Affairs, we should do according to law enforcement,” he said. “Whatever their race is, they have to stay under our control if they are staying in Myanmar. Otherwise, get out.”

Activists and human rights groups said the minister’s comments threatened to further inflame the delicate situation.

“What the minister said is so egotistic and emotional,” said a Muslim activist who declined to be named for fear of retaliation. “[The Rohingya] are not those who came to stay there, it is their original place… So this is propagative, factually incorrect and inflammatory and I am really sad about it.”

Shaivalini Parmar of Civil Rights Defenders, a Swedish NGO, said it was critical that the government defuse tension to prevent an escalation in violence.

“Any effort to maintain peace and security in Rakhine is severely undermined when the Minister of Home Affairs is publicly making blatantly inflammatory comments about the Rohingya,” she said.

Myanmar’s government officials have a history of driving anti-Muslim sentiment, added Matthew Smith, founder and CEO of nonprofit Fortify Rights.

“It’s disturbing that a government minister would imply the Rohingya don’t belong or that they’re invaders who pose a threat to Buddhist culture. It’s flagrant, especially at such a critical time.

“For years the authorities have tried to change the ethnic demographics of Rakhine State. We’ve exposed severe population-control restrictions, violence that may amount to acts of genocide, and more subtle methods, such as incentivizing Buddhists to move to Muslim-populated areas.

“The notion that the Muslim population is exploding is contradicted by data. We appreciate knowledge based on credible data rather than craven assumptions rooted in religious discrimination. We would expect more from a senior government minister.”

While state counselor Aung San Suu Kyi has appeared to seek a levelheaded approach to the crisis, saying that justice should be doled out in accordance with the “rule of law” and emphasizing allegations against Aqa Mul Mujahidin were based on a single source, other members of the administrated have had a more hot-headed response.

Deputy defense minister Maj-Gen Myint Nwe told a press conference on Monday that supporting a ‘peoples’ militia’ in Rakhine state was, while not feasible currently, a “long-term plan that needs serious consideration”.

Africa Human Development Report 2016 | UNDP

Gender inequality is costing sub-Saharan Africa on average $US95 billion a year, peaking at US$105 billion in 2014– or six percent of the region’s GDP – jeopardising the continent’s efforts for inclusive human development and economic growth, according to the Africa Human Development Report 2016.

Source: Africa Human Development Report 2016 | UNDP

Advancing Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment in Africa

Gender inequality is costing sub-Saharan Africa on average $US95 billion a year, peaking at US$105 billion in 2014– or six percent of the region’s GDP – jeopardising the continent’s efforts for inclusive human development and economic growth, according to the Africa Human Development Report 2016.

 

The report analyses the political, economic and social drivers that hamper African women’s advancement and proposes policies and concrete actions to close the gender gap. These include addressing the contradiction between legal provisions and practice in gender laws; breaking down harmful social norms and transforming discriminatory institutional settings; and securing women’s economic, social and political participation.

 

Deeply-rooted structural obstacles such as unequal distribution of resources, power and wealth, combined with social institutions and norms that sustain inequality are holding African women, and the rest of the continent, back. The report estimates that a 1 percent increase in gender inequality reduces a country’s human development index by 0.75 percent.

Highlights

  • African women achieve only 87 percent of the human development outcomes of men
  • African women hold 66 percent of the all jobs in the non-agricultural informal sector and only make 70 cents for each dollar made by men
  • Only between 7 and 30 percent of all private firms have a female manager
  • Gender gap costs sub-Sahara Africa $US95 billion a year

The Future Has Begun

cfyoauwwgaeakb91113Critics  claim that Egypt is bare of freedom. Hence a lot of NGO’s and think tanks have put their effort into (I’m slightly exaggerating) a ‘failed state’ narrative, leading…

Source: The Future Has Begun

overwhelming solidarity, with which Egyptian citizens financed the Suez-Canal project through state-certificates, lead me to hope that Sisi’s call ‘People! Roll-up-your-sleeves!’ would trigger wide-spread initiatives. Instead I came to realize, that more than sixty years in varying degrees of suppressive governance has formed a nation, in which only the most energetic individuals find their way to the surface of an otherwise cumbersome work population.

Turkey will not compromise with U.S. on cleric’s extradition, PM says — The Crusader Journal

On Saturday the Turkish Prime Minister suggested the Turkish government was not interested in any type of compromise with the United States regarding the extradition requests of an Islamic cleric living in the U.S. that Turkey claims masterminded the recent Turkish coup attempt. (CBC) – Turkey will not compromise with Washington over the extradition of the […]

via Turkey will not compromise with U.S. on cleric’s extradition, PM says — The Crusader Journal