Trust and Accountability: Why Transparancy is at the Core of Our Mission

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens. As the […]

https://markgeoffreykirshner.com/2016/04/23/trust-and-accountability-why-transparancy-is-at-the-core-of-our-mission-4/

Trust and Accountability: Why Transparancy is at the Core of Our Mission

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens. As the […]

https://markgeoffreykirshner.com/2016/04/23/trust-and-accountability-why-transparancy-is-at-the-core-of-our-mission-4/

Trust and Accountability: Why Transparancy is at the Core of Our Mission

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens. As the […]

https://markgeoffreykirshner.com/2016/04/22/trust-and-accountability-why-transparancy-is-at-the-core-of-our-mission-3/

Trust and Accountability: Why Transparancy is at the Core of Our Mission

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens. As the […]

https://markgeoffreykirshner.com/2016/04/22/trust-and-accountability-why-transparancy-is-at-the-core-of-our-mission-2/

Trust and Accountability: Why Transparancy is at the Core of Our Mission

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.
As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.
UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.
has been verified by Rise: R48b34e3c8a75da50a662065d3ad1cb5f

https://markgeoffreykirshner.com/2016/04/20/11678/

Trust and Accountability: Why Transparancy is at the Core of Our Mission

img_0106

@HelenClarkUNDP

  • Helen ClarkAdministrator, United Nations Development Programme

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

More:

Transparency International Development Helen Clark

  • Helen ClarkAdministrator, United Nations Development Programme

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

More:

Transparency International Development Helen Clark

Helen Clark
Administrator, United Nations Development Programme 

As Prime Minister of New Zealand, I worked in an environment where, by law, citizens were entitled to access official information. So when I came to lead UNDP, I asked: ‘Why can’t we be just as open?’ There was no good reason not to be. Accordingly we at UNDP embraced the International Aid Transparency Initiative and worked hard to meet its high standards.

Thanks to incredible efforts and commitment from UNDP staff, we have succeeded in having our organization recognized as being the most transparent aid organization in the world. For two years in a row now, UNDP has topped the Aid Transparency Index compiled by Publish What You Fund, an organization which advocates for and measures aid transparency. All of us at UNDP take great pride in this achievement.

We have placed transparency at the very core of our mission. We believe it is vital to build and maintain trust with all our partners and with the citizens we serve in developing countries. Those who channel funding through us have a right to know how it is used, and so do citizens.

As the lead and coordinating agency in the UN development system, UNDP is well placed to share its experience of becoming highly transparent with sister UN agencies. Getting there requires a clear vision of what needs to be done, and strong staff commitment to bring about a change of culture in the way information is handled. Innovation in the use of technology is needed to capture and visualize data.

UNDP’s commitment to transparency does not end with simply publishing reams of data. We have also committed to using data in ways which improve our work. That means consulting our data as a key step in planning our projects. This helps ensure that our work is effective because it is done in the full knowledge of the information and evidence we have.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. We must commit to continual improvement in the quality of our data. We must work each day to make the data as comprehensive as we can. For UNDP, this is about being the very best development organization we can be, and about building and maintaining trust and confidence across all our partners.

Follow Helen Clark on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/HelenClarkUNDP

 

More:
Transparency International Development Helen Clark

 has been verified by Rise: R48b34e3c8a75da50a662065d3ad1cb5f

The Monday Extract: More Milking than Massage – on Helen Clark and the Media | The Spinoff 

Helen Clark and the media: it’s like a thesis subject. She cowed them, bossed them, milked them. How did she get away with it? Extracts from Helen Clark: Inside Stories by Claudia Pond Eyley and Dan Salmon explore the phenomenon, with views from Clark’s former media advisor and (authorised) bio

Source: The Monday Extract: More Milking than Massage – on Helen Clark and the Media | The Spinoff

img_1791211214111311133121123411222122111211111111122111522111321112141111CReOQzXWUAA-GvWdiplomat-artist-logo-150x1501111546162630871211

Helen Clark and the media: it’s like a thesis subject. She cowed them, bossed them, milked them. How did she get away with it? Extracts from Helen Clark: Inside Stories by Claudia Pond Eyley and Dan Salmon explore the phenomenon, with views from Clark’s former media advisor and (authorised) biographer Brian Edwards and journalist and (unauthorised) biographer Denis Welch.

BRIAN EDWARDS: Helen did have a media honeymoon, but I think it was a different sort of media honeymoon. If you look back on Helen’s career from when she came into Parliament in 1981, there were very few women in Parliament then, it was a very difficult time for her and she was treated extremely badly by the men in Parliament.

There was an extraordinary amount of sexism, she was accused of being lesbian, there was never any truth about that, jokes were made about her voice, her hair, about the way she dressed, you name it. That was an absolutely miserable time and I think that probably set it firmly in her mind that being in opposition was a dreadful thing.

She experienced all that opposition and lack of respect, and some quite nasty stuff that came not just incidentally from the National Party but from other areas as well.

HELEN CLARK: You can’t be available every minute of the day or night, but inevitably in public life, if you’re out and about, you’re going to have stand-ups. The media are going to want to have access so you have to organise around that. I had to turn out to a press conference every week, no matter how sticky things were, and over the time I was prime minister, this practice of always stopping you on the bridge walking to Parliament developed as well.

So those media scrums became kind of inevitable and less satisfying, obviously, than something that you could give more thought to. But, yeah, I think media expect access and you have to try to arrange for that in a way that is not too disruptive.

DENIS WELCH: When Helen Clark became prime minister she milked the media and made it very easy for the media to relate to her. She knew how the media worked, she cul­tivated them, we liked her, I liked her. She was someone you could relate to, talk to, but she wasn’t one going around and massaging the media as some tend to do.

HELEN CLARK: There was obviously a lot of morning radio shows and you built up those which you could fit in. I did quite a number as prime minister. I had a routine of doing the TV breakfast shows and the Paul Holmes interview which I’d pre-record quite early in the morning before I left for the airport. Radio Dunedin was another very loyal station, Neil Collins down there was a marvellous interviewer who I spoke to every Monday morning.

There are the people like Neil Collins and Mikey Havoc at bFM, who are without malice, it’s really a kind of a ‘service radio’ if you like: Mikey to his youth and student audience, Neil to a Dunedin audience that listens to him morning after morning. So you can have a much closer relationship in a way with them because they’re not out to score off you or to take you down.

BRIAN EDWARDS: How it works is that media advisors like Judy and me, we are not involved in the policy – that is not our field – so whatever the policy is, you hum it and we’ll sing it. That is the arrangement. So for most of the three years between elections we would be chatting, say once a week.

For individual programmes, for a very big interview, we might meet and chat it through: “What are they going to ask?” “What are you going to say?” “Maybe here’s a better idea.” And so on. Mostly she knew all the stuff anyway.

HELEN CLARK: I love Mikey Havoc. I talked to Mikey Havoc on the radio probably for the best part of fifteen years, and I thought he did a great job. In fact he was one of the best interviewers because he had no malice. He just wanted to know what you were doing, what are you thinking. It was always a very lively interview.


Helen Clark: Inside Stories by Claudia Pond Eyley and Dan Salmon (Auckland University Press, $39.99) is available at Unity Books.